Ring in December…Snow, Conferences, Biblical Archeology, Anselm, the British Library, Oh My!!!

Well, December is here, and, right on cue, we got our first real snow around 10:30 on December 1.  I’m pausing in that seemingly endless parade of student papers, emails, conferences, applications, dissertation research and writing, article prep, etc. (youse all are feeling it too, give me some love…), to get rid of some of these tabs which are cluttering up my browser.

Let’s start with a fascinating article from National Geographic on the controversies in Israel over archeological findings.  I’m not saying that I answer for the article’s analysis or anyone featured in it; but it is fascinating stuff, and it is worth knowing about some of the latest findings and the nature of the arguments.

Ok…what’s next.  The AHA has posted a call for proposals dealing with technology and digitization projects:

the AHA 2012 Program Committee would like to encourage panel, roundtable, and demos of technology pertaining to research, communication, archiving, and other activities related to scholarship.  We welcome tech demos of new or developing technologies or digitization projects.  We also recommend roundtables to discuss such projects, their advantages and possible pitfalls.

If you have any digital projects under way, this might be worth pursuing.  Might be an incentive for me to make more progress on this Chivalry and Warfare database I’ve been developing…

I just got a notice from H-HRE that the Pontifical Institute in Toronto is starting a new diploma program in manuscript studies.  In format, it sounds similar to the Intensive Latin Summer Program (which I highly recommend to anyone who wishes to acquire 2+ years of Latin in 8 weeks).  Details can be found on the Institute’s website.

Ever tried to navigate the Cotton Collection from the British Library, and been very frustrated at how extremely diverse the collection seems to be?  Well, the British Library has some helpful information on catalogs and guides; there is supposed to be an online catalog debuting soon (well, last year, but apparently it’s not done yet), as well as a new print catalog.  In the mean time, HRI Online has a very decent catalog (I’m not sure if it’s complete).  Good stuff.  I was prompted to investigate this after learning of the Nero DVI manuscript’s treatise on the rights and prerogatives of the earl marshal, most likely prepared for one of my main dissertation characters, Thomas Brotheron (thanks to Alison Marshall’s great dissertation…).  After it turned out that we had it on microfilm at the UR, I gritted my teeth and decided to find a catalog of the Cotton collection!!

Not to get political, but this WikiLeaks kerfuffle continues to intrigue me…Not sure if where it falls under international law or even philosophical positions on freedom of speech/information.  But my feeling is that the supposedly huge effects from the leak of US diplomatic documents won’t be as large as folks are saying.  We’re just too deluged with information these days…The New York Times has a great article from last week on the first impressions of the event…

Lastly, Medievalists.net keeps on posting these fascinating articles…There’s a recent one on Anselm’s theology in Cur Deus Homo, and a great article from Judith Bennett on “compulsory service in late medieval England,” from Past and Present.  Great stuff, as usual…

Ok, back to it!  I wish everyone a good evening.

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