April 9, 1865, part 3

Appomattox C. H. Va.
Apl. 9th 1865
GEN. R. E. LEE,
COMD.G C. S. A.
GEN.
In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the Sth
inst. I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of N. Va. on
the following terms: towit:
Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate One
copy to be given to an officer designated by me, the other to be retained
by such officer or officers as you may designate. The officers
to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the
Government of the United States until properly exchanged and
each company officer or regimental commander sign a like parole
for the men of his mes their commands.

The Arms, Artillery and public property to be parked and
stacked and tumed over to the officer appointed by me to receive
them. This will not embrace the side Arms of the officers nor their
This private horses or baggage.—This done each officer and man
will be allowed to retum to their homes not to be disturbed by
United States Authority so long as they observe their parole and
the laws in force where they may reside.

Very respectfully
U. S. GRANT Lt. Gn

The Papers of U.S. Grantvol. 14, p. 373-4

April 9, 1865 part 2

GEN. R. E. LEE,
COMD.G C. S. A.
GENERAL,
Your note of this date is but this moment, 11.50 a. m. rec’d.
in consequence of my having passed from the Richmond and
Lynchburg road to the Farmersville & Lynchburg road. I am at
this writing about four miles West of Walker’s Church and will push forward to the front for the purpose of meeting you. Notice
sent to me on this road where you wish the interview to take place
will meet me.
Very respectfully
your obt. svt
U. S. GRANT
LtGn

The Papers of U.S. Grantvol. 14, p. 372-3

April 9, 1865

Apl. 9th 1865

GN. R. E . LEE
COMD.G C, S. A.

GENERAL,
Your note of yesterday is received. As I have no authority to
treat on the subject of peace the meeting proposed for 10 a. m.
to-day could lead to no good. I will state however General that I
am equally anxious for peace with yourself and the whole North
entertains the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can be
had are well understood. By the South laying down their Arms
they will hasten that most desirable event, save thousands of human
lives and hundreds of Millions of property not yet destroyed.
Sincerely hoping that all our difiiculties may be settled without
the loss of another live I subscribe myself

very respectfully
your obt. svt,
U. S. GRANT
LtGn

The Papers of U.S. Grantvol. 14, p. 371

Medieval and Military History with a Pinch of Attitude

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